Farewell, Fossils!

Farewell, fossils!Fossil fuels are a thing of the past. Even utility, coal, natural gas, and oil companies recognize the power of renewable energies, especially solar power. While the International Energy Agency (IEA) and U.S. Department of Energy’s Energy Information Administration (EIA) predict a slowing down of solar installation, all signs say that it’s not—especially with fossil fuel companies going green.

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Solar Panels from Sea to Shining Sea

We may not know all the services our government provides for us (The United States Board on Geographic Names – who knew?!), but one thing that you’ll notice with a sharp eye is that a lot of our government buildings are run on solar power. This is especially interesting because government often sets the tone for the future. Our government’s interest in solar energy displays the value of this energy source and saves citizens money.

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Solar Innovation: Task Unification of Ground Mount Solar Arrays

Drew Boyd and Jacob Goldenberg recognized patterns of innovation to create a systematic approach with Subtraction, Division, Multiplication, Task Unification and Attribute Dependency. They call it the Systematic Inventive Thinking (SIT), or Inside the Box innovation. We’re going to do a series of how solar technologies approach innovation. Let’s take a look at how Task Unification plays out in standard ground mount solar arrays!

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What’s My Carbon Footprint (and Why Should I Care)?

Dear Wanda,

 What’s My Carbon Footprint (and Why Should I Care)?

 -Big Foot

Hey Big Foot!

You may have heard the term “carbon footprint” for quite some time now, but most anyone would struggle explaining what it is to someone. You might know that it has something to do with the environment or that it is something that you want to reduce.

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The Steps You Should Take to Get the Most Out of Your Panels this Winter!

Solar panels thrive in the sunlight, so this begs the questions: How do solar panels perform in colder months? Thankfully, solar panels only require sunlight, not heat. This means that solar panels are absolutely capable of powering your home during the winter. In fact, some solar panel users have reported higher solar panel output when there is snow since it can act as a reflective blanket for sunlight. 

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