Tag Archives: innovation

Solar Innovation: On the Road Again

Drew Boyd & Jacob Goldenberg recognized a pattern in innovation to create a systematic approach: Subtraction, Division, Multiplication, Task Unification and Attribute Dependency. They call it the Systematic Inventive Thinking, or SIT. We’re doing a series of how solar technologies approach innovation. Let’s take a look at how some of these innovation approaches (Task Unification and Attribute Dependency) apply to solar technologies in roadways across the world.

Highway Sounds Barriers

Photo Source: electrek
Photo Source: electrek

The solar systems used in the Netherlands were designed to the specific function of creating sound barriers along highways. And there’s some great art on the walls, to boot! The solar panels sound barriers were tested with a variety of panels and designs, and eventually the ones being installed now were greenlit as the standard. This invention uses Task Unification where the array serves two purposes: (1) reducing sound disruption from the road and (2) producing electricity for the grid. The installations also use Multiplication by using the other side of the PV cells to capture twice as much light. This is called a bifacial solar cell. This beats putting up concrete barriers that don’t do anything else but grow ivy on them and break apart!

Solar Roads

Solar roads—actual roads made from PV cells that you drive on—are becoming more common, even here in the United States. We look forward to seeing what other cities have in store!

Conway, Missouri

Solar Roadways' walkway, Source: Motor Authorirty
Solar Roadways’ walkway, Source: Motor Authorirty

For a pilot project, the state of Missouri hired Solar Roadways to install hexagonal solar panels as a walkway at the state’s welcome center in Conway. If successful, the same technology will be used for its stretch of Route 66’s road. The PV roads are designed to have the same traction as pavement, so they shows the patterns of Task Unification by being solar panels and roads, including even having LED lights that also serve as painted road stripes. However, the panels are show Attribute Dependency! Depending on the temperature, the solar road can adapt. It can melt snow and ice immediately to prevent accidents or closures.

Normandy, France

The Normandy village of Tourouvre-au-Perche had the innovative company Colas install 1 km (.6 mi) of its Wattway solar road to power all of its street lights. As of now, it is still in its two-year trial, to see if it’s worth installing more. “Colas said the panels have been covered with a resin containing fine sheets of silicon, making them tough enough to withstand all traffic, including HGVs.” This concept once again uses Task Unification in using the solar panels as roadways that also provide electricity for the street lights that, in turn, shine light on the roadway.

The Ray, Georgia

The Ray's solar stretch; Image Source: The Ray
The Ray’s solar stretch; Image Source: The Ray

A 16-mile stretch of I-85 in southwest Georgia, known as The Ray, is testing how solar can revolutionize the Georgia infrastructure by making it sustainable. In fact, the stretch of road is going to be an ecosystem that serves both the natural and manmade worlds and is filled with Task Unification patterns. West Point’s rest stop has an electric car charging station powered by solar panels, Colas installed their Wattway roadway, and the a tire pressure system was installed to improve road safety. Cars drive over the system, which measures your tires’ air pressure, and drivers receive notifications by ticket or text about their tire pressure.

The project included other natural ways to green the roadway with patterns of Attribute Dependency. “The Ray works to use that land. Kernza wheat, whose deep roots help retain clean water and trap carbon, grows on the shoulder. Bioswales, drainage ditches filled with native Georgia vegetation, capture pollutants during rainstorms,” says USNews. “A 7,000-square-foot pollinator garden provides a butterfly and honeybee habitat.”  Eventually, the pollinator garden will use Task Unification to double as a solar field in October 2018, and the Ray will shortly begin its autonomous vehicle pilot program. Executive Director of The Ray, Allie Kelly tells Curbed, “We’re at a tipping point in transportation. In five to ten years, we won’t remember a time when we invested a dime in infrastructure spending for a road that only did one thing.” Amazing!

Icon Solar will always bring you the best technology for the best price possible to give you maximum financial benefit from a solar system. We strive to stay up-to-date on the latest technologies, and we look forward to what innovations arise in the solar industry. Stay tuned to see what innovations are out there in our blog!

Solar Innovation: Inspired by Nature

Drew Boyd & Jacob Goldenberg recognized a pattern in innovation to create a systematic approach: Subtraction, Division, Multiplication, Task Unification and Attribute Dependency. They call it the Systematic Inventive Thinking, or SIT. We’re doing a series of how solar technologies approach innovation. Let’s take a look at how some of these innovation approaches (Task Unification and Attribute Dependency) apply to solar technologies inspired by nature.

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Solar Innovation: Task Unification of Ground Mount Solar Arrays

Drew Boyd and Jacob Goldenberg recognized patterns of innovation to create a systematic approach with Subtraction, Division, Multiplication, Task Unification and Attribute Dependency. They call it the Systematic Inventive Thinking (SIT), or Inside the Box innovation. We’re going to do a series of how solar technologies approach innovation. Let’s take a look at how Task Unification plays out in standard ground mount solar arrays!

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Ready to be the Leader of the Pack? Here’s How to Show Your Neighbors How to Save Thousands.

Doing something different can be nerve-wracking. In fact, only about 2.5 percent of the population are made up of “Innovators.” Innovators, the title bestowed upon the sect of the population most willing to adapt technology, aren’t hard to identify. Their natural habitat is camping outside Apple waiting itching to get their hands on the latest iPhone release. Innovators and Early Adopters – the brave group following the innovators who compose 13.5 percent of the public – are risk-takers, but they usually stand to reap most of the rewards. Solar panels aren’t brand new technology, but you may still be concerned about being the first of your family and friends to test the benefits.

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“And They Said a Phone Wouldn’t Work…” The Next Best Technology (That Will Save You Thousands)

Let us tell you a story that may make you think differently about a major money-saving endeavor.

It is fabled that in the late 1800s Alexander Graham Bell offered to sell his patent on the telephone to Western Union for $100,000. As the story goes, the committee assigned to investigate the telephone invention included the following in its report:

“We do not see that this device will be ever capable of sending recognizable speech over a distance of several miles. Messer Hubbard and Bell want to install one of their ‘telephone devices’ in every city. The idea is idiotic on the face of it. Furthermore, why would any person want to use this ungainly and impractical device when he can send a messenger to the telegraph office and have a clear written message sent to any large city in the United States? … Mr. G.G. Hubbard’s fanciful predictions, while they sound rosy, are based on wild-eyed imagination and lack of understanding of the technical and economic facts of the situation, and a posture of ignoring the obvious limitations of his device, which is hardly more than a toy … This device is inherently of no use to us. We do not recommend its purchase.” *

This would be a good time to say, “I told you so!” Regardless of whether the story is true, it paints the picture of how it’s difficult to anticipate how or at what pace a new technology will work or supplement an old one. That is certainly the case with solar power.

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